External Blogs

Key Biodiversity Areas

Key Biodiversity Areas
(June 05, 2020)   -   One way to focus conservation efforts is by using a new conservation tool called Key Biodiversity Areas(KBAs). KBAs are areas with exceptionally high biodiversity values. KBAs may be areas important toendangered or rare species or ecosystems, sites that hold large aggregations of species at certain timesof the year (e.g. migratory stopovers for birds, or caribou calving grounds) or large ecologically intactareas with low levels of human disturbance.

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Thinking big to conserve small but important species

Thinking big to conserve small but important species
(May 21, 2020)   -   Through the Key Biodiversity Areas program, rare, endemic and underappreciated species are finally getting their due as important components of their ecosystems.

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It’s time to start paying attention to Canada’s peatlands

It’s time to start paying attention to Canada’s peatlands
(May 01, 2020)   -   Meg Southee, WCS Canada's GIS Analyst and Spatial Data Manager writes about the importance of conserving northern peatlands for Canadian Geographic.

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Hasty development of Ontario’s Ring of Fire could have devastating impacts

Hasty development of Ontario’s Ring of Fire could have devastating impacts
(February 27, 2020)   -   WCS Canada scientists, Justina Ray and Cheryl Chetkiewicz explain what's at stake when developing the Ring of Fire in the far north in Ontario

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Beluga whales’ silence speaks volumes

Beluga whales’ silence speaks volumes
(January 20, 2020)   -   We don’t fully understand how the growing acoustic disturbances caused by human activities on the ocean – such as sonar, oil drilling or the movement of large shipping vessels – is affecting whales and other marine mammals. But judging by their behaviour when exposed to these noises, we can speculate that it is at best unwelcome and at worse a survival threat that interferes with communications, causes extreme stress, and can even lead to death.

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Commentary: Burning wood for energy is not a climate-friendly policy

Commentary: Burning wood for energy is not a climate-friendly policy
(January 10, 2020)   -   Don Reid and Hilary Cooke, based out of the Whitehorse office of WCS Canada explain why biomass energy, or wood burning, isn't a green alternative.

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Warmer, wetter climate benefits some birds as wetlands vanish

Warmer, wetter climate benefits some birds as wetlands vanish
(November 04, 2019)   -   The grasslands of the Canadian Prairies are a hidden gem for bird watchers, with millions of migratory birds passing through the area each year. But they are also one of the most transformed landscapes in the world, vanishing more quickly than the Amazon rainforest. Our new study found that climate change is affecting birds and aquatic insects more strongly than the temperature and precipitation in a given year. 

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Commentary: Change is on our doorstep

Commentary: Change is on our doorstep
(October 08, 2019)   -   Yukoners are fortunate to be surrounded by wildlife in our daily lives. We could casually dismiss reports on the biodiversity crisis as irrelevant to Yukon where our wild nature is flourishing. That would be short-sighted and even dangerous. Change is on our doorstep. 

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What’s the Best Way to Welcome Bats to the Neighborhood? The Goldilocks Approach.

What’s the Best Way to Welcome Bats to the Neighborhood? The Goldilocks Approach.
(September 27, 2019)   -   Recent observations suggest possible problems with bat houses, and a need to revisit artificial roost structures. In fact, existing approaches may only meet some of the varied needs of bats and could, in some cases, create death traps in a rapidly warming climate.

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Muskwa-Kechika: An opportunity for bold conservation action

Muskwa-Kechika: An opportunity for bold conservation action
(September 24, 2019)   -   Wildlife Conservation Society Canada has mapped a larger and better-connected network of protected areas across the Greater Muskwa-Kechika. The result is a proposal to essentially double the existing area of protection. That may sound like a recipe for conflict with loggers and miners, but in reality, our proposed network has been carefully designed to avoid the few areas where there is any tangible interest in resource development. 

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