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Tiny Songbird Makes Record Migration, U of G Study Proves

(March 19, 2019)   -   For the first time, University of Guelph biologists have tracked an annual migration of up to 20,000 kilometres made by the 12-gram blackpoll warbler, one of the fastest declining songbirds in North America.

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Across North America and the Atlantic, Documenting an Enormous Migration Journey for a Tiny Songbird

(March 19, 2019)   -   AMHERST, Mass. ­– Blackpoll warblers that breed in western North America may migrate up to 12,400 miles roundtrip each year, some crossing the entire North American continent before making a nonstop trans-ocean flight of up to four days to South America. Now a new study led by first author Bill DeLuca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and project lead Ryan Norris at the University of Guelph, Ontario offers details of the feat.

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Studying the Elusive Wolverine, a Threatened Species in Northern Ontario

Studying the Elusive Wolverine, a Threatened Species in Northern Ontario
(March 01, 2019) Matthew Scrafford is the Wolverine Conservation Scientist within Ontario’s Northern Boreal Landscape program at WCS Canada. In this piece for the Thunder Bay Field Naturalist, Matt describes how he found himself a wolverine expert, and the challenges and rewards he faces trying to conserve the species in the field. Read Matthew's article in Nature Northwest here

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Life Under the Ice

Life Under the Ice
(February 20, 2019) With ice melting in Canada’s Northwest Passage, the area will soon be a new route for international shipping. This will have potentially big impacts on the life there. We are studying the area and planning for this with local communities, government scientists, and managers. For one part of that work, we are going to document the marine life in the western Canadian Arctic, in particular the remote and mostly frozen Viscount Melville Sound. Let’s look under the ice!Read more on the&nb...

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Ontario’s review of Endangered Species Act must address long-term ecosystem damage

Ontario’s review of Endangered Species Act must address long-term ecosystem damage
(January 31, 2019) Are protections for endangered species just another bureaucratic burden that is holding back economic development in Ontario? That’s the below-the-surface premise that seems to lie behind the Ford government’s latest action to “streamline” environmental regulation in this province. Last week, the government announced a review of the Endangered Species Act, saying that the current act is “unclear, administratively burdensome, time consuming and costly for applic...

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Mapping the decline of Canada’s caribou

Mapping the decline of Canada’s caribou
(October 30, 2018) “Caribou: one hoof in the grave.” So read the epitaph on a two-metre-high tombstone Greenpeace erected in front of federal environment and climate change minister Catherine McKenna’s office on May 1, 2018. The stunt aimed to draw attention to the plight of the country’s boreal woodland caribou, the protection of which has faced “many delays” according to a mid-April 2018 report from the federal environment commissioner.All of Canada’s caribou s...

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A whale of a problem developing in Canada’s Arctic

A whale of a problem developing in Canada’s Arctic
(October 01, 2018)  The horrors of right whales drowning in tangles of fishing ropes and the alarming prospect of endangered orcas crossing paths with oil-laden tankers has created more than a few headaches for the federal government. From the Atlantic to the Pacific, the feds have been forced to respond to public—and legal—demands that more be done to save threatened cetaceans.But Canada actually borders three oceans and it is in that often overlooked third ocean—the Arctic—that the f...

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Keeping carbon on the ground

Keeping carbon on the ground
(September 12, 2018) To mark the Global Climate Action Summit, WCS scientists have authored a series of blogs about how we are working with Indigenous Peoples to advance conservation and climate action, from the Congo to Canada’s Boreal.  In the final part of the series, WCS Canada’s Cheryl Chetkiewicz looks at the important role of boreal forests, wetlands and peatlands in storing carbon and how Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas could play a central role in helping t...

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Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas and Climate Change in Canada’s Boreal Forest

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas and Climate Change in Canada’s Boreal Forest
(September 12, 2018) At 5.6 million square kilometres, Canada’s boreal region is one of the largest forests in the world and one of the Earth’s most important forest carbon storehouses, making it critical to the global effort to address climate change. The boreal forest contains almost twice as much carbon per unit area as tropical forests.In addition to the carbon stored in surface vegetation, carbon has accumulated and been conserved over millennia in the soils, wetlands, peatlands, and permafrost &nda...

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Taking it slow can help reduce impacts of Arctic shipping on whales

Taking it slow can help reduce impacts of Arctic shipping on whales
(August 28, 2018) For 19th-century adventurers like Sir John Franklin, navigating a path through the ice-choked Northwest Passage — the Holy Grail of Arctic exploration — was a treacherous and often deadly undertaking. Today, thanks to climate change, traveling through the passage is quickly becoming another exotic option for cruise ship passengers — and an enticing shortcut for cargo ships.But an increasingly ice-free Arctic means more than just a chance for a new sightseeing adventure: Signifi...

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