WCS Canada Muddy Boots

Muddy Boots in the Boardroom: WCS Canada's approach to protecting iconic wildlife species and spaces. A board member's perspective.

(January 08, 2018) By: Dr. Sherman Boates, WCS Canada Board of Directors   It is the ‘muddy boots” part of science that first got me and many of my WCS Canada colleagues hooked on wildlife and the environment.  As a child, I was a nature nerd, captivated for hours on summer days, playing in a stream or pond, catching and observing fish, amphibians and invertebrates. I also recall the relentless hooting of barred owls as I sat by a late winter campfire in a back-country sugar maple forest...

READ THE STORY


Caribou a key test of federal resolve to protect species at risk

Caribou a key test of federal resolve to protect species at risk
(November 06, 2017) By: Justina Ray Following right on the heels of Halloween, the federal government has released a very scary report on how caribou are faring across Canada.   Five years ago, the federal government finalized a recovery strategy for boreal forest caribou -- work that was triggered by the listing of caribou as threatened under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA).   This recovery strategy broke new ground.  Rather than just designating specific areas as “critical habitat,&rd...

READ THE STORY


Flying high for wildlife conservation

Flying high for wildlife conservation
(September 07, 2017) Amazon wants to use them to deliver you packages, but for a wildlife conservation organization, drones (also called Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  - UAVs) are a great new tool for getting a better picture of some pretty remote places. In the past, if we wanted to get a sense of the habitat found over a large area, we might have used satellite imagery.  We still do use such imagery, but satellites have some limitations.  For example, a satellite may only pass over an area once every two ...

READ THE STORY


Open Science Opens Doors

Open Science Opens Doors
(August 08, 2017) By Monica Granados Open science is the belief that access to scientific results and data should not be limited by your race, nationality or economic status. Practicing open science involves breaking down paywalls and making scientific results and data openly accessible to anyone, anywhere. But wait, isn’t sharing data and results one of the cornerstones of science?  On the surface, yes. But today many scientific findings are still locked away in tightly controlled academic journals.&n...

READ THE STORY


Page 2 of 2First   Previous   1  [2]  Next   Last